The Curriculum

Introduction

Our Curriculum Intent


We intend for our curriculum to help instill our three school values of Community, Integrity and Mastery. Furthermore, we want it to cultivate a passion for learning as well as inspire curiosity, confidence and a strong sense of self worth. We expect all of our students to study the full curriculum and retain a comprehensive understanding of the subject matter. We aspire for children to have the right attitudes, sufficient knowledge, skills and cultural capital necessary for them to succeed in secondary school and beyond.


How our curriculum is taught


At Charlbury we follow the National Curriculum. English and maths are taught daily, usually in the mornings, and we have a specific session allocated to teach phonics and/or other crucial reading skills. The majority of our English is planned around a high quality text chosen to enrich children’s cultural capital. Science, PSHE, Art, D&T are taught on a weekly basis with the rest of the subjects being taught in blocks of up to four weeks during the remaining time in the school week.


Our curriculum has been constructed to provide children with a number of opportunities to review learning so that key knowledge from the National Curriculum is retained in children’s long term memory. Each taught unit forms a building block that is continually reinforced and strengthened during the child’s time with us. Our teaching & learning policy is based strongly around Rosenshine’s Principles of Instruction which places a significant emphasis on daily, weekly and monthly review. When planning, staff take notice of children’s existing knowledge when planning each unit. This knowledge comes from low stakes assessments that can be completed by the children before, during and/or after the topic.


We have high aspirations for all of our learners no matter what their barriers to entry but acknowledge that children may require additional scaffolding for them to be able to achieve the success they are capable of.


Our Context


Charlbury and the surrounding area falls within the 20% least deprived neighbourhoods within the country. However, our knowledge of the families we work with lead us to believe that there are significant disparities in developing cultural capital within our community. Because of this, we make no assumptions that any child will have had access to enrichment opportunities. This has become particularly poignant given the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Our long term curriculum map for 2021-22 is available here.

We are always looking to improve our curriculum to ensure that it is both engaging and memorable for every child. Below you will find some more details on our intentions for each subject; how we implement it and the impact that it has/will have on our children.

English (inc. Phonics)

We teach children to read using the Read. Write. Inc (RWI) phonics program to enable them to be capable and confident readers whilst supporting their spelling. A parent guide to phonics can be found here. A link to the Letters and sounds Youtube channel can be found here. There are further videos on YouTube that are a great resource for parents helping children with their phonics at home.

Children in Reception, Year 1 and Year 2 receive daily phonics lessons in small groups based on their phonetical understanding. Children are provided with fully decodable books to read and share at home.


Our approach to teaching English is currently under review.


Maths

At Charlbury Primary School, we believe that mathematics is essential to everyday life. It is our intention to provide all children with a high-quality mathematics education, which will enable them to make sense of the world and develop their ability to calculate, reason and solve problems. We want to foster a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject that extends beyond the classroom and lasts for life. We believe that all children can achieve in mathematics and foster positive “can do” attitudes towards the subject. We intend to provide a mathematics curriculum that is creative and engaging, that all children can access and make progress in lessons. It is our intention to develop lively, enquiring minds and to encourage pupils to become self-motivated, confident and capable in order to solve problems that will become an integral part of their future. Our mathematics curriculum fulfils the requirements of the National Curriculum and Early Years Learning Goals.


It is our intent that our children will:


  • Become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics through varied and frequent practice.

  • Develop the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately to problem solving.

  • Reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry.


  • Recognise and understand mathematical relationships.


  • Use mathematical language correctly and use it to explain their reasoning and workings.


  • Solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication and persevering in seeking solutions.

  • Have a positive attitude to the subject and be willing to take risks.

  • Have a wide range of experiences through a variety of teaching methods and learning situations.

  • Develop their own methods of working, building on from what they understand with the aim of becoming mathematically fluent.

  • Have the opportunity to acquire mastery in all areas of mathematics.

  • Have access to appropriate resources to facilitate them to work independently.


We follow the programme of study as detailed in the National Curriculum, which is set out year-by-year for key stages 1 and 2, and supported by the Maths No Problem series of materials. The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly the same pace. Children who grasp concepts rapidly will be challenged through being offered rich and sophisticated problems before any acceleration through new content. Those who are not sufficiently fluent with earlier material will consolidate their understanding, including through pre-teaching and additional practice, before moving on. All children in the Early Years Foundation Stage have daily opportunities to develop their mathematical understanding, primarily through play, to meet the needs of Development Matters. The two strands of Mathematics taught in the EYFS are Numbers and Shape, Space and Measure.


To ensure high standards of teaching and learning in mathematics, we implement a curriculum throughout the school that seeks to develop children’s knowledge, understanding and skills and then to apply these to a variety of contexts including real problems. Opportunities are given for investigations and practical work as well as for consolidation and practice of skills. Children are provided with challenging opportunities to master mathematical skills and develop independent learning. Lessons are planned and sequenced so that new knowledge and skills build on what has been taught previously. All abilities in a class are catered for through differentiated tasks and where appropriate different maths strategies. Staff refer to the Maths Calculation Policy when teaching formal methods, understanding that sometimes children find their own efficient methods along the way. Great importance is placed upon the teaching of mental mathematics. In KS1 and KS2, children are also given the opportunity to practise and improve their rapid recall of multiplication facts. Mathematical language is explicitly taught and children are encouraged to use it correctly when explaining their reasoning and working out.


By the end of KS2, we aim for children to be fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics and have the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately to a variety of problems.


We measure the impact of our curriculum through the following methods:


  • Summative termly assessments taken by pupils.

  • Termly data analysis by maths subject lead and SLT

  • Lesson observations and feedback

  • Book scans on a regular basis

  • Learning walks and pupil voice conversations.

  • Annual reporting of standards across the curriculum.

If you would like to find out more information about maths, please contact Mrs Davids through the school office.

Science

The intention of the French curriculum at Charlbury Primary is that children are taught to develop an interest in learning other languages in a way that is enjoyable and engaging. We strive to stimulate and encourage children’s curiosity about language. We aim to develop their awareness of cultural differences in other countries, through our protected characteristics, British values and curriculum enrichment opportunities. Skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing will be embedded into the curriculum in order to enable children to use and apply their French learning in a variety of contexts and lay the foundations for future language learning.

Our MFL curriculum is designed to progressively develop children’s skills in languages. Children progressively acquire, use and apply a growing bank of vocabulary organised around topics. We follow the ‘La Jolie Ronde’ Scheme of work to ensure coverage and progression across school.


Children are encouraged and supported to develop their speaking and listening skills through conversational work, singing activities and games. As confidence and skill grows, children record their work through pictures, captions and sentences.

  • displays are used to remind children of key vocabulary

  • practical activities, songs and games are used to help improve memory and recall.

  • In the classroom, whether possible instructions are given in French to expose children to the language as much as possible and in day to day contexts.

  • Visual prompts are used to support children in translating new vocabulary.

  • Word mats/ Knowledge organisers are available for children to have out on desks to support their learning and recap previous learning.


French is monitored by subject lead throughout all KS2 year groups using a variety of strategies such as book looks, lesson observations, staff discussions and pupil interviews. Feedback is given to teachers.




Computing

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking (logic, evaluation, algorithms, patterns, decomposition, abstraction) and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, with many natural links between the subjects that help to reinforce subject knowledge across much of the curriculum. Our computing curriculum is designed to ensure that children can understand and apply the fundamental aspects of computational thinking .


Computing at Charlbury is taught in blocks of 1-2 weeks for Years 1-6 with cross curricular links made where they would support the long term retention of knowledge and skills. Units of work have been selected from the high quality ‘Teach Computing’ curriculum which has been developed by the National Centre for Computing Education (NCCE). These are adapted when necessary to suit the context of the class. Priority has been given to the topics that support computational thinking in order to ensure that children have a high degree of skill and knowledge in computer programming before they leave us.


In the Early Years, resources are made available to support children’s interest in computing in line with our ‘Learning Through Play’ statement.


Our approach will allow children to have a strong grounding in computational thinking. This means children will be able to complete tasks with a high degree of difficulty independently. The study of computing will allow children a greater understanding of where other subjects, such as mathematics, science and design & technology fit into life outside of Charbury. Regularly used skills, such as problem solving, will further aid the development of the child across the curriculum. Regular review will be a major part of the teaching process to enable a high level of achievement.


The Foundation Subjects

Art

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up” Pablo Picasso


At Charlbury Primary School the art curriculum stimulates imagination and creativity. It promotes careful observation and an appreciation of the world around us. Children explore ideas and meanings through studying the work of artists and designers and the impact they have had on contemporary life and on different periods and cultures.


Art is a highly valued element in our curriculum. We aim to:

  • engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art

  • introduce a variety of media to help pupils become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques

  • encourage pupils to evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art

  • ensure pupils know about great artists and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.


The National Curriculum for art aims to ensure that all children

  • produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences

  • become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques

  • evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design

  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.


At Charlbury Primary School this is embedded in the classroom through a series of structured Units of Work delivered throughout the school year and designed to cover the above skills. As pupils move up through the school these skills are revisited in greater depth and at greater levels of complexity.


Where relevant, cross curricular links are made to other subjects across the curriculum in order to enhance and give further meaning to the children’s overall thematic learning.


Children are given the opportunity to further refine their developing skills in whole school activities such as art competitions, workshops from visiting artists, trips to art exhibitions and after school art clubs. Art work is displayed with pride on boards in classrooms and corridors and this is shared with parents via our virtual art gallery.


At Charlbury Primary School pupils can articulate the artistic skills they are developing and talk about lessons they have enjoyed and pieces of work they have produced. They can talk about the artists they have studied. Pupils develop their artistic skills over time, building on their subject knowledge and skills as they progress through the school. Pupils are encouraged to enjoy art in as many ways as they choose – both as a creator and observer.


We measure the impact of our curriculum through the following methods:


  • Lesson observations

  • Ongoing assessments

  • Display boards around the school

  • Talking to pupils about their experiences

Design & Technology

A high-quality design & technology education helps to enable our children to approach problems creatively and innovatively using a variety of different resources. Design & technology has deep links with mathematics, science, and computing with many natural links between the subjects that help to reinforce subject knowledge across much of the curriculum. Our curriculum is designed to encourage pupils to design, make and evaluate a variety of products as well as reinforcing key technical knowledge.


The national curriculum for design and technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world

  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users

  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others

  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.


Design & technology at Charlbury is taught in blocks of 1-2 weeks for Years 1-6 with cross curricular links made where they would support the long term retention of knowledge and skills. Units of work have been planned by teachers alongside the descriptors within the National Curriculum. These are adapted when necessary to suit the context of the class. In Year 5 & 6, food technology lessons are delivered in small groups by skilled and experienced teacher.


In the Early Years, resources are made available to support children’s interest in design & technology in line with our ‘Learning Through Play’ statement.


Our approach will allow children to have a strong grounding in the design process. This means children will be able to complete tasks with a high degree of difficulty independently. The study of design & technology will allow children a greater understanding of where other subjects, such as mathematics, science and design & technology fit into life outside of Charbury. Regularly used skills, such as problem solving, will further aid the development of the child across the curriculum. Regular review will be a major part of the teaching process to enable a high level of achievement.

Geography

At Charlbury Primary school we aim to inspire children with an interest in their surrounding and the wider world. Our curriculum is simultaneously designed to explain the creation of certain natural features, as well as to encourage children to question the purpose of manmade developments. Skills and core content have been mapped out in order to ensure that the requirements of the National Curriculum have been met; this forms the basis on which deeper learning and geographical understanding can be built. Children will discover the wonderful uniqueness of different environments and geographical formations; plus, they will identify similarities between economies and societies, gaining insight into how they are connected to the world. Children will learn about geographical processes as well as significant human and physical features. We will enthuse children with a delight in this planet and a desire to know more: creating explorers from within our classrooms. Community is a key value celebrated at Charlbury school and it is a key feature of our geography curriculum: they are members of the school community, they belong as part of the local community and they are citizens of the world.

The geography curriculum will be delivered through topics. Cross curricular links will be made to further build children’s understanding of a subject. Teaching will link into prior learning and help children develop secure geographical foundations. Children will develop skills through using a range of resources. Children will use a range of maps, images and statistics. Critical thinking and observations will be employed in order to consider similarities, differences and the impact of change. As well as studying the world as it is currently, children will look back into the past to understand how our planet has changed. When considering these geographical changes over time – both human and natural – children will then be able to hypothesise about potential future changes. Providing children with the appropriate geographical skills and vocabulary will allow them to make observations and formulate ideas. Field work will allow children to take an active role in the acquisition of geographical knowledge and skills.

Our approach will allow children to learn within a supportive and collaborative ethos. This means children will be able to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes and how this affects landscapes and environments. The study of local and world geography will help pupils make sense of a complex and dynamically changing world. Students will become aware of their responsibilities to their environment, each other and the world at large – as future custodians of our planet. Pupils will be approaching subject matter in a range of ways: meaning that they will be developing their literacy, creative, mathematical observational and reasoning skills whilst learning about geography. Regular review will be a major part of the teaching process to enable a high level of achievement.


Children’s work will be collated in folders. These folders will travel up through the school with the child, creating a portfolio of children’s learning in geography. Thus, children will see that all their work in geography is meaningful – that it is a learning journey with purpose. Knowledge Organisers will be used to clearly set out key learning and information for children; these Knowledge Organisers can be referred to by children to remind them of key facts and vocabulary. Quizzes will be used at the end of a unit of work to check children’s understanding and retention of information. The quizzes will be used as a formative assessment tool, showing both the pupil and teacher areas that need recapping or require further development.






History

The history curriculum at Charlbury Primary School has been designed to systematically build children’s knowledge of British and world history developing a firm chronology and finding meaningful links. A study of local history will mean that children have a greater understanding of their environment and how it has been shaped. Children will be able to use reflections upon the past to help them understand their present. Change, diversity and morality will be discussed within this context. Children’s curiosity and desire to investigate and become historical detectives will be encouraged. Our overall aim is develop keen and questioning historians, able to make connections and evaluate, with a solid historical schemata on which to build further learnin

The history curriculum will be delivered through topics. Cross curricular links will be made to further build children’s understanding of a subject. Teaching will link into prior learning and help children develop a secure historical chronology. Children will develop skills through looking at a range of resources and considering their significance. Critical thinking and observations will be employed in order to consider similarities, differences and the impact of change. Independent research projects, where children can pursue a particular area that has ignited their interest, will be encouraged as homework tasks: children will be able to share these with the class and thus further facilitate a breadth of study. Educational visits, the handling of artefacts, historical days and visitors will enrich children’s learning experiences.

Our approach will allow children to investigate historical topics, figures and events in depth. This means children will be able to make meaningful connections to other historical points, modern life and other areas of the curriculum. The study of local history will allow children a greater understanding of where they fit into British history. Pupils will be approaching subject matter in a range of ways: meaning that they will be developing their literacy, creative, observational and reasoning skills whilst learning about history. Regular review will be a major part of the teaching process to enable a high level of achievement.

Children’s work will be collated in folders. These folders will travel up through the school with the child, creating a portfolio of children’s learning in history. Thus, children will see that all their work in history is meaningful – that it is a learning journey with purpose. Knowledge Organisers will be used to clearly set out key learning and information for children; these Knowledge Organisers can be referred to by children to remind them of key facts and vocabulary. Quizzes will be used at the end of a unit of work to check children’s understanding and retention of information. The quizzes will be used as a formative assessment tool, showing both the pupil and teacher areas that need recapping or require further development.








Music

“If taught well, music has the potential to make a significant contribution to children’s development: increasing confidence and self-esteem, developing leadership, team working, concentration and problem-solving skills, and developing identity and improving social cohesion within the school and wider community.”

(Music Mark https://www.musicmark.org.uk/)


The National Curriculum for music aims to ensure that all children

  • Perform, listen to, review and evaluate music

  • Be taught to sing, create and compose music

  • Understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated.


At Charlbury Primary School this is embedded in the classroom through a series of structured Units of Work delivered throughout the school year and designed to cover the above skills. As pupils move up through the school these skills are revisited in greater depth and at greater levels of complexity.


Where relevant, cross curricular links are made to other subjects across the curriculum in order to enhance and give further meaning to the children’s overall thematic learning.


Children are given the opportunity to further refine their developing skills in weekly singing assemblies run by the Music Coordinator, participation in Young Voices for KS2 children, OCC First Access Brass in Year 4, Upper KS2 bands, after-school singing and ukulele clubs. Pupils also have the opportunity to continue their brass lessons into Years 5 or 6 with the OCC instructor and we have visiting specialist teachers of the piano, violin, electric and classical guitar, bass guitar and drums.


Individuals or groups of children are encouraged to perform during whole school assembiles in order to celebrate and share their musical skills. Performances to parents consist of class assemblies, an R/Y1/Y2 nativity, various KS2 productions, a carol concert and Chinese New Year celebration assembly. The School Choir is active within the local community, performing at events such as the Charlbury Beer Festival, Arts Society Festival, The Street Fair, The Riverside Festival and Charlbury Christmas Market. Parents and pupils sing Christmas carols together to raise money for the CSA.


At Charlbury Primary School pupils can articulate the musical skills they are developing and talk about lessons they have enjoyed. They can talk about the music they have listened to, sing in a variety of musical styles , use instruments to respond to songs and improvise their own music. Pupils develop their music skills over time, building on their subject knowledge as they progress through the school. They are used to performing to a range of audiences and are able to talk about what they have enjoyed and learnt about by performing in a range of local events.


Pupils are able to enjoy music in as many ways as they choose – either as listener, creator or performer. They can dissect music and comprehend its parts. They can sing and feel a pulse. They have an understanding of how to further develop skills less known to them, should they ever develop a further interest in music in their lives.


We measure the impact of our curriculum through the following methods:


  • Lesson observations

  • Performances and recordings

  • Talking to pupils about their experiences


Physical Education

At Charlbury Primary School the intent of teaching Physical Education (PE) is to give children the tools and understanding to encourage and enable lifelong participation, which can have a positive impact on their own physical health and well-being.

PE can challenge and promote self-esteem through the development of physical confidence and problem solving. It can help children maximise their potential, developing a range of life and learning skills, to be able to cope with both success and failure in competitive, individual and team based physical activities.

PE is taught at Charlbury Primary School by a combination of teachers and TAs, in a supportive environment where effort as well as success is recognised.


EYFS


Moving and handling - children show good control and co-ordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment and tools effectively. This will be provided by a combination of gross and fine motor control activities, teacher and child lead. They will use a range of equipment, in outdoor and internal areas.


Health and self-care - children will be given the appropriate opportunities to discuss the importance for good health of physical exercise, and a healthy diet, and talk about ways to keep healthy and safe.


KEY STAGE 1 AND 2

The key knowledge and skills of each topic are mapped across each year group, using RealPE. This ensures that children develop their knowledge of games, dance, gymnastics and athletics progressively. The skills in these areas are also therefore developed systematically, using the RealPE framework for each year group building on previous learning and preparing for subsequent years. Knowledge and skills are informed and linked to enable achievement of key stage end points, as informed by the National Curriculum.

We teach lessons so that all children have equal opportunities to;

  • develop fundamental movement skills. With a focus on agility, balance, coordination and fitness.

  • to provide a range of sports experiences during which they develop their skills and learning through competitive, team and individual sports.

  • enjoy communicating, collaborating and competing with each other.

  • develop an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports and learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success.

  • To have the opportunity to participate in competitions/tournaments with our Chipping Norton Partnership Schools and WOSSP.

Through our curriculum and wider school sports opportunities we aim to developing a range of fundamental movement skills alongside broader abilities, with personal, social and emotional development particularly important. These include, confidence, self-esteem, determination, resilience, communication skills and the ability to work with and learn from others. They should have determination to want to succeed and challenge themselves and take responsibility for their own health and fitness. Our aim is also to develop communication, teamwork and leadership skills, in which they have the confidence to transfer to other situations.

Our impact is therefore to ensure that every child feels valued, included, challenged and supported in their learning. That they have the confidence to use the underpinning skills in an independent and effective way to live happy and healthy lives.

Assessment will be carried out by the class teacher using the RealPE Cogs Assessment Documents:

Multi-ability

Fundamentals

Personal Best















Religious Education

RE is fundamental to understanding, appreciating and responding to the world in which we live. It is therefore a subject that will be pivotal to pupils beyond their school life as they navigate their own lives and encounter various faiths and beliefs that are different from their own. It promotes respect and open-mindedness towards ways of life and beliefs are different from their own. It also encourages pupils to develop their sense of identity and belonging through self-awareness and reflection.

The principle aim of RE is to engage pupils in an enquiry approach where they can develop an understanding and appreciation for the expression of beliefs, cultural practices and influence of principle religions and worldviews in the local, national and wider global community. It is necessary to acknowledge that some of our pupils will have had less experience of the diversity that their community has to offer. Therefore, RE becomes a very special opportunity to create this link and begin the journey towards broadening their cultural experiences.

It is essential that pupils are provided with subject specific knowledge regarding a variety of religions so that they have a strong foundation of key concepts, beliefs, practices and vocabulary associated with each. As they progress throughout our school, they will continue to build on prior knowledge and understanding while applying subject specific skills at a deeper level. We understand the necessity for our pupils to begin exploring aspects of religion at the earliest opportunity. This is why it has been introduced to them in Foundation Stage through stories and role plays which provide exposure through the environment and promotes discussion. Our goal is to be able to build on pupils’ learning at each stage so that as they progress throughout school, they are able consolidate, develop and deepen their learning.


Religious Education is unique in the school curriculum in that it is neither a core nor a foundation subject, however the Guidance released in 2010 views it as an important curriculum subject.

EYFS - children will be taught RE through playing and exploring and active learning. Children will also be encouraged to think critically and develop their own ideas and strategies for doing things.

In Key Stage 1, children will be taught RE in three strands:

  • Learning about religion

  • Learning from religion

  • Breadth of study


In Key Stage 2, pupils are taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through deeper enquiry into known religions as they progress through the school. They explore key questions through conceptual enquiry into Christianity whilst also drawing from Hinduism, Islam and Judaism, as well as non‐ religious worldviews as appropriate, recognising the impact of religion and belief locally, nationally and globally.

  • They make connections between differing aspects of religion and consider the different forms of religious expression.

  • They consider the beliefs, teachings, practices and ways of life central to religion.

  • They learn about sacred texts and other sources and consider their meanings.

  • They begin to recognise diversity in religion, learning about similarities and differences both within and between religions and beliefs and the importance of dialogue between them.

  • They extend the range and use of specialist vocabulary.

  • They recognise the challenges involved in distinguishing between ideas of right and wrong, and valuing what is good and true.

  • They communicate their ideas, recognising other people’s viewpoints.

  • They consider their own beliefs and values and those of others in the light of their learning in religious education.


Experience and enrichment opportunities at Charlbury:


  • exploring sacred texts

  • using imaginative play or drama to express feelings and ideas

  • responding to images, games, stories, art, music and dance

  • meeting visitors from local religious communities

  • making visits to religious places of worship where possible, and where not, making use of videos and the internet

  • taking part in whole school events- (multi-faith days, Harvest Festival, school performances)

  • using ICT to further explore religion and belief globally

  • comparing religions and worldviews through discussion

  • debating and communicating religious belief, worldviews and philosophical ideas and answering and asking ultimate questions posed by these


Impact

Through the implementation of the RE curriculum pupils will be able to:

  • extend their knowledge and understanding of religions and beliefs

  • develop a religious vocabulary and interpret religious symbolism in a variety of forms • reflect on questions of meaning, offering their own thoughtful and informed insights into religious and secular world-views

  • explore ultimate questions of beliefs and values in relation to a range of contemporary issues in an ever-changing society


The impact of RE is monitored and assessed in a number of ways. We look at the extent to which our pupils are engaged in discussions with their peers, sharing their own beliefs with others to understand and appreciate differences between themselves and the children around them. Through pupil interviews, students are able to articulate what they have learned when prompted by their work. These interviews, as well as other observations both within RE lessons and everyday school life, enable us to gather evidence of the extent to which our pupils demonstrate welcoming, clear communication and respect of pupils with beliefs different to their own. Through the careful planning and continuous review of an engaging RE curriculum, we can observe how our pupils show and apply their own moral compass as well as accumulating an increased cultural capital.

Further Subjects

French

The intention of the French curriculum at Charlbury Primary is that children are taught to develop an interest in learning other languages in a way that is enjoyable and engaging. We strive to stimulate and encourage children’s curiosity about language. We aim to develop their awareness of cultural differences in other countries, through our protected characteristics, British values and curriculum enrichment opportunities. Skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing will be embedded into the curriculum in order to enable children to use and apply their French learning in a variety of contexts and lay the foundations for future language learning.

Our MFL curriculum is designed to progressively develop children’s skills in languages. Children progressively acquire, use and apply a growing bank of vocabulary organised around topics. We follow the ‘La Jolie Ronde’ Scheme of work to ensure coverage and progression across school.


Children are encouraged and supported to develop their speaking and listening skills through conversational work, singing activities and games. As confidence and skill grows, children record their work through pictures, captions and sentences.

  • displays are used to remind children of key vocabulary

  • practical activities, songs and games are used to help improve memory and recall.

  • In the classroom, whether possible instructions are given in French to expose children to the language as much as possible and in day to day contexts.

  • Visual prompts are used to support children in translating new vocabulary.

  • Word mats/ Knowledge organisers are available for children to have out on desks to support their learning and recap previous learning.


French is monitored by subject lead throughout all KS2 year groups using a variety of strategies such as book looks, lesson observations, staff discussions and pupil interviews. Feedback is given to teachers.




PSHE

At Charlbury School we aim to develop our children so that they achieve their full potential as young citizens. We aim to provide a supportive, happy and purposeful learning environment where they can grow academically, socially and emotionally, and believe this can best be achieved through a collaborative culture involving parents, Governors and the local community. We aim to build on and complement the learning begun in their early years at home to provide the knowledge, understanding and skills they will need to lead healthy, fulfilling and meaningful lives as they move on into the future as young people and adults. Our Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education underpins all our children’s learning in the classroom, school and wider world.


PSHE education encourages children to become aware of and contribute to the life of their community and society as a whole, developing their capacity to be active and effective future citizens and building the skills and strategies which will allow them to live healthy, balanced, productive and responsible lives. PSHE education provides opportunities for children to explore the complex and sometimes conflicting range of values and attitudes they will encounter as they mature, and to reflect on and clarify their own understanding and beliefs about the world in which they live. This is done through a developmental, whole school approach to learning so that children acquire the qualities and attributes they need to thrive and to manage their lives competently and positively both as individuals and as members of their families and wider society.


In addition, PSHE education contributes significantly to personal development, helping to build confidence, resilience and self-esteem. Children become more competent in identifying and managing risk, making informed decisions and in understanding the influences driving their decision making. PSHE education enables them to recognise, accept and shape their identities, to understand and accommodate difference and change, to manage emotions and to communicate constructively in an increasingly complex social world. As they develop a fuller understanding of themselves, they also develop empathy, understand better their rights and responsibilities, and are better able to form and maintain positive relationships. Accurate and relevant knowledge provided by the PSHE education curriculum and opportunities to explore it in a safe, constructive and respectful environment allow children to clarify and, if necessary, challenge their own and others’ values, attitudes and beliefs.


Our PSHE programme of study – SCARF (Safety, Caring, Achievement, Resilience, Friendship) aims to equip our children with the knowledge, understanding, skills and strategies required to become healthy, independent and responsible members of society. It covers all the required objectives and follows the three core areas of Health and Wellbeing, Relationships and Living in the Wider World. It also fulfils the requirements of the 2020 Statutory Relationship and Health Education which enables all pupils to build good, safe and healthy relationships now and in their future lives.There is now a proven link between children's health and wellbeing, and their academic progress. Crucial skills and positive attitudes developed through a structured, comprehensive, sequential PSHE education programme are critical to ensuring children are effective learners. SCARF provides a high-quality, inspiring curriculum with excellent enrichment experiences to enable children to develop these essential life skills. It is designed to be taught in thematic units with a spiral approach, ensuring themes can be revisited and children can recall and build upon previous learning, exploring the underlying principles of PSHE education regularly at a depth that is appropriate for the age and stage of their education. These units are:


Me and My Relationships

Valuing Difference

Keeping Myself Safe

Rights and Responsibilities

Being My Best

Growing and Changing


All lessons include supporting materials and prioritise the building of a rich bank of vocabulary. We aim to deliver our PSHE education curriculum in a creative way by using strategies such as role play, music, singing, discussion, debate, games, etc. These strategies enable children to build good learning behaviours such as confidence, resilience, curiosity, and responsibility, and allow them to explore sometimes complex or conflicting issues in a safe, supported and familiar way. PSHE education is an important part of our school assemblies where learning can be consolidated and children’s spiritual, moral, social and cultural curiosity stimulated, challenged and nurtured.


The SCARF programme of study provides our school with an effective framework for pupils’ wellbeing. Pupils are enabled to develop the vocabulary, confidence and resilience to clearly articulate their thoughts and feelings within an environment that encourages openness, trust and respect and know when and how they can seek the support of others. They will apply their understanding of society to their everyday interactions, from the classroom and the school to the wider community of which they are a part. SCARF actively supports our school which prioritises physical and mental health, providing pupils with the skills to evaluate their own wellbeing needs, practice self-care and contribute positively to the wellbeing of those around them. Continuous formative assessment opportunities are built into each unit, which enables self-evaluation, reflective learning and allows teachers to evaluate and assess progress, modifying and revisiting units as necessary.

Our PSHE provision has a positive impact on the whole child, including their attainment and progress, by mitigating any social and emotional barriers to learning and building on their self-esteem. We believe that through the effective delivery of the SCARF curriculum we enable pupils to develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to succeed at school and in the wider world. It is important to remember that assessment in PSHE education is not about levels, grades, passing or failing, but should compare each child’s progress with his or her own starting point. The impact of SCARF can be monitored and assessed in a number of ways. We can look at the extent to which children are engaged in discussions with their peers, sharing their own beliefs and ideas with others, and the extent to which they listen to and appreciate the ideas of their peers. We can observe behaviour in the classroom and the playground, and engage children in more formal discussions and interviews. The SCARF materials encourage children’s personal reflection on their learning, giving them a place to record what they found helpful, thought-provoking or challenging, and where their learning might take them to next. SCARF also offers pre and post assessment activities for the children to complete and allows teachers to summarise children’s learning either individually or as a class against each unit's key learning outcomes. These varied forms of assessment will allow us to evaluate the extent to which our children are developing the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to succeed at school and achieve their full potential as young citizens in the wider world.